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Posts for tag: crowns

By Comprehensive Dental Group
October 07, 2021
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: dental implants   crowns  
WhichImplantCrownAttachmentMethodisBestforYou

If you've decided on a dental implant to replace a missing tooth, you've made a great choice. Implants are a big favorite of both dentists and patients, not only for their life-likeness, but also their durability. Studies show that more than 95% of implants survive after ten years.

As you may know, single tooth implants are composed of two main parts: a metal post (usually titanium) imbedded in the jawbone; and a life-like crown affixed to the end of the post. But what you may not know is that there are two ways to attach the crown—either with screws or with dental cement.

Neither way is superior to the other—both have their own set of advantages and disadvantages. A cemented crown, for instance, usually looks more like a natural tooth than a screw-retained crown (more about that later) and dentists have more flexibility in making them look natural.

But cemented crowns require an additional piece of hardware called an abutment to better match it with the implant, something unnecessary with a screw-retained crown. Some people can also experience a reaction to the cement resulting in inflammation or even bone loss. And once installed, removing the crown later for repair or replacement is much more difficult than with a screw-retained crown.

Besides attaching directly to the implant, screw-retained crowns don't require cement and are more easily attached and removed. But the screw-hole can pose some aesthetic problems: Although it can be filled with a tooth-colored filling, the tooth's appearance isn't as ideal as a cemented crown.

So, which one is best for you? That will depend on the type and location of teeth being replaced, as well as your dentist's preferences. For instance, a more attractive cemented crown may be better for a visible front tooth, while a screw-retained crown might be a good choice for a back premolar or molar where appearance isn't as big a factor.

In the end, it's likely your dentist will discuss the pros and cons for each method as it pertains to your individual case. Whichever way your crown attaches, the end result will still be a life-like tooth that could last you for years to come.

If you would like more information on dental implants, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “How Crowns Attach to Implants.”

By Comprehensive Dental Group
April 20, 2019
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: crowns  
RoyalTreatmentforaDamagedTooth

If your tooth sustains damage that compromises its structure — typically through decay or trauma — you have several options depending on the extent of the damage: One of them is a crown. This method saves the tooth and its root and completely conceals the visible portion of the tooth, or crown, under a natural-looking cap made to mimic as closely as possible the size, shape and color of the original tooth.

Crowns also hide imperfections in the original tooth like discoloration, chipping, fractures, excessive wear (from bruxism, or tooth grinding, for example), or abnormalities in the way the tooth formed. And they’re used following root canal treatments, which treat infected pulp at the center (canal) of a tooth root by removing the pulp and replacing it with an inert, rubber-like material.

Saving the natural tooth has long been the goal of dentistry because normal micromovements of the tooth root, which is suspended in its jawbone socket by elastic ligaments, stimulate the surrounding bone to rejuvenate. Without that stimulation, the bone continues to lose old cells, but no longer replaces them. Crowns are also designed to restore tooth function.

The function and location of the damaged tooth can determine what material the crown will be made of. If the damaged tooth is clearly visible when you smile, porcelain, the most realistic-looking material, is almost always used. If the tooth receives significant bite force, a stronger material is considered — either, a gold/porcelain combination, or a high-strength ceramic. If you are restoring a second molar, an all-gold crown may be considered.

With the advent of dental implants, saving a damaged tooth is no longer the only option for preserving the health of the bone surrounding the tooth root. The implant — a tiny biocompatible, titanium screw-like artificial root — is placed in the jawbone and is then capped with a natural-looking crown of course!

If you would like more information about dental crowns, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Crowns & Bridgework.”

By Comprehensive Dental Group
March 25, 2019
Category: Cosmetic Dentistry
Tags: root canal   crowns   toothache   Endodontics  

Woman's ToothacheA toothache is a miserable experience, especially if swelling, drainage, and bad breath accompany it. Luckily, root canal therapy from Comprehensive Dental Group in Stamford, CT, can eliminate the pain safely and allow you to keep your tooth! Your dentists, Dr. Irina Pogosian and Dr. Thomas Ohlson, keep smiles intact and healthy through this treatment—read on to learn more!

 

Root canal therapy explained

Root canal therapy treats a tooth's interior pulp when it's become inflamed or infected due to injury, decay, etc. During an appointment at our Stamford practice, your dentist will X-ray and inspect your tooth, along with the surrounding gums and bone. If Dr. Pogosian or Dr. Ohlson determines that the tooth is viable, you'll undergo a comfortable, two-visit procedure right here at Comprehensive Dental Group.

To begin, your dentist will inject the area around the tooth with local anesthetic. When the tooth is numb, they will create a small opening in the tooth to access the root canals. That's where the blood vessels, nerves, and connective tissue reside.

The dentist then removes the pulp with specialized tools, before smoothing and disinfecting each canal (there are up to four in a single tooth), and sealing them with biocompatible gutta-percha. After each canal is treated, a temporary crown covers the tooth so that it can heal.

In a week, you'll have your second treatment. Here, Dr. Ohlson or Dr. Pogosian removes the temporary cap and installs a custom-fabricated crown made of premium-grade ceramic. Your restored tooth will look, feel, and act perfectly natural—no more pain!

The American Association of Endodontists says that you'll likely keep your tooth for the rest of your life. That's how successful root canal therapy is! Just brush twice a day with a quality toothpaste, and carefully floss around your treated tooth to avoid plaque and tartar build-up. See your dentist at Comprehensive Dental Group in Stamford every six months for a complete check-up and hygienic cleaning.

 

Contact us

Don't suffer from toothache pain when your friends at Comprehensive Dental Group can save that tooth and make you feel better! Call us today at (203) 359-3296.

By COMPREHENSIVE DENTAL GROUP
August 28, 2018
Category: Cosmetic Dentistry
Tags: crowns   Same Day Crowns  

Same-Day CrownsAfter plain old fear and anxiety over going to the dentist, lack of time is probably one of the biggest reasons that many people skip going to the dentist for regular check ups and dental cleanings or to fix a problem like a chipped or cracked tooth. But in addition to the cosmetic effects, skipping necessary dental repairs and restorations could also affect your oral and general health as a result. But it has never been easier or more convenient to get the dental care that you need. The dentists at Comprehensive Dental Group, Dr. Irina Pogosian and Dr. Thomas Ohlson, offer same day crowns for quick and efficient dental restorations in Stamford, CT.

CEREC Same Day Crowns in Stamford, CT

Thanks to developments in digital imaging technology, it is now possible for your dentist to design and create dental crowns right in the office without sending them out to a lab for fabrication. The crowns can be prepared while you wait, all in a single appointment.

CEREC (Chairside Economical Restoration of Esthetic Ceramics) same day crowns allow your dentist to take total control of the restoration process, saving you time and cutting out the need for additional office visits while providing a modern, high quality, natural-looking restoration.

How CEREC Same Day Crowns Work

Instead of taking a physical dental impression and sending it out to a third party lab, the dentist takes a digital image with a camera, which is then uploaded to a computer. The restoration is designed using the CAD/CAM (Computer Aided Design / Computer Aided Manufacturing) program and then produced using an onsite milling machine. The crown is bonded in place, and your tooth is as good as new. And the best part is that in most cases, the entire procedure can be completed in as little as an hour.

Find a Dentist in Stamford, CT

For more information about CEREC same day crowns, contact Comprehensive Dental Group by calling (203) 359-3296 to schedule an appointment with Dr. Ohlson or Dr. Pogosian today.

By Comprehensive Dental Group
March 01, 2018
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: crowns  
AreYouintheKnowAboutDentalCrownsTakeourTrueorFalseQuiz

So, you're about to have a tooth capped with a crown. Do you know what you need to know before you undergo this common dental procedure?

Here's a short true or false quiz to test your knowledge of dental crowns.

All crowns are the same. False — while all crowns have the same basic design — a life-like prosthetic tooth fitted over and bonded or cemented to a natural tooth — their compositions can vary greatly. Early metal crowns consisted mainly of gold or silver and are still used today. Porcelain-fused-to-metal (PFM) crowns — a metal interior for strength overlaid by a porcelain exterior for appearance — became popular in the latter 20th Century. Although still widely used, PFMs have been largely surpassed by newer all-ceramic materials that are stronger than past versions.

Crowns can differ in their artistic quality. True — all crowns are designed to replicate a natural tooth's function — in other words, enable the tooth to effectively chew again. But a crown's appearance can be a different story, depending on how much attention to detail and artistry goes into it. The higher the individual craftsmanship, the more lifelike it will appear — and the more expensive it can be.

With digital milling equipment, dental labs are obsolete. False — although technology exists that allows dentists to produce their own crowns, the equipment is not yet in widespread use.  The vast majority of crowns are still produced by a trained technician in a dental laboratory. And just as you base your choice of a dentist on your confidence in and respect for them, dentists look for the same thing in a dental lab — good, reliable and consistent results.

Your insurance may not cover what your dentist recommends. True — dental insurance will typically pay for a basic, functional crown. Aesthetics — how it will look — is a secondary consideration. As a result, your policy may not cover the crown your dentist recommends to function properly and look attractive. A new crown, however, is a long-term investment in both your dental function and your smile. It may be well worth supplementing out of pocket your insurance benefit to get the crown that suits you on both counts.

If you would like more information on crown restorations, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation.