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Posts for tag: toothache

By Comprehensive Dental Group
October 17, 2019
Category: Oral Health
Tags: toothache  
YourToothacheMightnotbeCausedbyaTooth

A toothache means a tooth has a problem, right? Most of the time, yes: the pain comes from a decayed or fractured tooth, or possibly a gum infection causing tooth sensitivity.

Sometimes, though, the pain doesn't originate with your teeth and gums. They're fine and healthy—it's something outside of your tooth causing the pain. We call this referred pain—one part of your body is sending or referring pain to another part, in this instance around your mouth.

There are various conditions that can create referred pain in the mouth, and various ways to treat them. That's why you should first find out the cause, which will indicate what treatment course to take.

Here are a few common non-dental causes for tooth pain.

Trigeminal Neuralgia. The trigeminal nerves situated on either side of the face have three large branches that extend throughout the face; the branch to the jaw allows you to feel sensation as you chew. When one of the nerve branches becomes inflamed, usually from a blood vessel or muscle spasm pressing on it, it can refer the pain to the jaw and seem like a toothache.

Temporomandibular Joint Disorder (TMD). These two joints that connect the lower jaw to the skull can sometimes become dysfunctional for a variety of reasons. This can set up a cycle of spasms and pain that can radiate throughout the jaw and its associated muscles. The pain can mimic a toothache, when it actually originates in the jaw joints.

Teeth Grinding. This is an unconscious habit, often occurring at night, in which people clench or grind their teeth together. Although quite common in children who tend to grow out of it, teeth grinding can continue into adulthood. The abnormally high biting forces from this habit can cause chipped, broken or loosened teeth. But it can also cause jaw pain, headaches and tenderness in the mouth that might feel like a toothache.

These and other conditions unrelated to dental disease can seem like a tooth problem, when they're actually something else. By understanding exactly why you're feeling pain, we can then focus on the true problem to bring relief to your life.

If you would like more information on oral pain issues, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation.

By Comprehensive Dental Group
March 25, 2019
Category: Cosmetic Dentistry
Tags: root canal   crowns   toothache   Endodontics  

Woman's ToothacheA toothache is a miserable experience, especially if swelling, drainage, and bad breath accompany it. Luckily, root canal therapy from Comprehensive Dental Group in Stamford, CT, can eliminate the pain safely and allow you to keep your tooth! Your dentists, Dr. Irina Pogosian and Dr. Thomas Ohlson, keep smiles intact and healthy through this treatment—read on to learn more!

 

Root canal therapy explained

Root canal therapy treats a tooth's interior pulp when it's become inflamed or infected due to injury, decay, etc. During an appointment at our Stamford practice, your dentist will X-ray and inspect your tooth, along with the surrounding gums and bone. If Dr. Pogosian or Dr. Ohlson determines that the tooth is viable, you'll undergo a comfortable, two-visit procedure right here at Comprehensive Dental Group.

To begin, your dentist will inject the area around the tooth with local anesthetic. When the tooth is numb, they will create a small opening in the tooth to access the root canals. That's where the blood vessels, nerves, and connective tissue reside.

The dentist then removes the pulp with specialized tools, before smoothing and disinfecting each canal (there are up to four in a single tooth), and sealing them with biocompatible gutta-percha. After each canal is treated, a temporary crown covers the tooth so that it can heal.

In a week, you'll have your second treatment. Here, Dr. Ohlson or Dr. Pogosian removes the temporary cap and installs a custom-fabricated crown made of premium-grade ceramic. Your restored tooth will look, feel, and act perfectly natural—no more pain!

The American Association of Endodontists says that you'll likely keep your tooth for the rest of your life. That's how successful root canal therapy is! Just brush twice a day with a quality toothpaste, and carefully floss around your treated tooth to avoid plaque and tartar build-up. See your dentist at Comprehensive Dental Group in Stamford every six months for a complete check-up and hygienic cleaning.

 

Contact us

Don't suffer from toothache pain when your friends at Comprehensive Dental Group can save that tooth and make you feel better! Call us today at (203) 359-3296.

By Comprehensive Dental Group
March 27, 2017
Category: Oral Health
Tags: toothache  
WhatsCausingYourThrobbingToothache

There are few more painful experiences than a toothache. You can't ignore it: it's as if your mouth is screaming for relief.

But while the throbbing pain can tell you something's wrong, it may not be clear exactly what's wrong. There's more than one possibility — it could be with the tooth itself, the gums around the tooth or a combination of both.

In the first case, a toothache could be a sign of severe tooth decay within the tooth's innermost layer, the pulp. The pain you feel comes from the nerves within the pulp under attack from the infection.

For this level of decay there's one primary way to save the tooth and stop the pain: a root canal treatment. In this procedure we remove all the infected and dead tissue from the pulp and fill the empty chamber and root canals with a special filling. We then seal and crown the tooth to prevent further infection.

Another source of toothache happens when your gums have become painfully inflamed due to infection. This is usually caused by periodontal (gum) disease, triggered by a thin film of bacteria and food particles on tooth surfaces known as plaque. In this case, we must remove all plaque and calculus (hardened plaque deposits) from tooth and gum surfaces, including on the roots. Your gums can then heal and return to health.

But your situation could be more complex. Untreated tooth decay can advance to the roots and subsequently infect the gums. Likewise advanced gum disease can pass the infection from the gums to the root and into the pulp.  For such cases you may need a specialist, either an endodontist specializing in root canal issues or a periodontist specializing in the gums.  They can better diagnose the origin and extent of the problem and offer advanced techniques and treatments to deal with it.

It's possible in these more complex situations your tooth has become diseased beyond repair and must be replaced. It's important, then, that you see us if you experience any significant tooth pain, even if it seems to go away. The sooner we diagnose and begin treating the cause of your pain, the better your chances of regaining your dental health.

If you would like more information on treating dental disease, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Confusing Tooth Pain.”